Cloud


Cloud
A cloud is water in the atmosphere (air) that we can see. It is where rain and snow comes from.
Water on the earth evaporates (turns into gas) and goes up into the sky. There, when it is colder, the water condenses: it changes from a gas to drops of water or crystals of ice. We see these drops of water as clouds. The drops fall back down to earth as rain, and then the water evaporates again. This is called the "water cycle".
Clouds on other planets are sometimes just collections of gases.
How clouds form.
Clouds form in places where air full of water cools, usually when the air goes up. This can happen
Clouds are heavy. The water in a cloud can have a mass of several million tons. Each cubic metre (m3) of the cloud has only about 5 grams of water in it. Cloud droplets are also about 1000 times heavier than evaporated water, so they are much heavier than air. They do not fall, but stay in the air, because there is warm air all round the heavier water droplets. When water changes from gas to droplets, this makes heat. Because the droplets are very small, they "stick" to the warm air.
On occasion, clouds appear to be brilliant colors at sunrise or sunset. This has shown to be due to pollution in the air.
water in it. Cloud droplets are also about 1000 times heavier than evaporated water, so they are much heavier than air. They do not fall, but stay in the air, because there is warm air all round the heavier water droplets. When water changes from gas to droplets, this makes heat. Because the droplets are very small, they "stick" to the warm air.
Types of clouds.
There are different sorts of cloud, because of how fast the air goes up and if the air stands still or is moving. Also, some clouds make more rain, or make thunder and lightning. These differences come from how big the water droplets are, and how they join together.
There are three basic types of clouds
As a sign.
In the Bible, clouds are often a sign of God's presence.


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