Flower of Scotland


Number of Words: 460

Flower of Scotland

Recognized as an unofficial national anthem of a country in United Kingdom, Flower of Scotland, written by Roy Williamson, belonged to the folk group dubbed as The Corries in 1966. The composer is a native of the land where his mother was a great influence on his career. As he learned to play the recorder by the ear and pretending to read the music, his teacher banned him from attending lessons. It was when that he transferred to Wester Elchies School; then to Aberlour House and lastly, to Gordonstoun in Moray. By 1955, he came across with Ronnie Browne who became his partner for thirty years in the craft that he was intrinsically skilled at.

The Flower of Scotland refers to the victory of the citizens under the leadership of King Robert the Bruce over the English monarch, King Edward II, at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314. The track is a favorite among the national rugby union team fans who were the pioneers in adopting it for the Lions tour in South America. The last two lines of every single verse are mostly sung with specific intensity especially when it is a game against the neighboring region of England. The state's football association also assumed The Flower of Scotland as its official pre- contest hymn in 1997.
The story of its popularity may not be that pleasant but the Flower of Scotland was introduced because of the opposition among the fans of rugby and football toward Britain's 'God Save The Queen' which constantly drowned out from ferocious booing and whistling of fans. In 2004, there was a public petition presented to the Parliament calling for another track to be chosen instead. The song did not push through since there was a counter argument that it was not passť after all. However, there was strong acceptance where they reasoned that the former days were the past and let it dwell in there. It went further that they can even move forward and develop it more successfully.
O flower of Scotland
When will we see your like again
That fought and died for your wee bit hill and glen
And stood against him
Proud Edward's army
And sent him homeward tae think again
The hills are bare now
And autumn leaves lie thick and still
O'er land that is lost now which thou so dearly held
That stood against him
Proud Edward's army
And sent him homeward tae think again
Those days are past now
And in the past they will remain
But we can still rise now and be the nation again
That stood against him
Proud Edward's army
And sent him homeward tae think again
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